<div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Feb 27, 2011 at 4:52 AM, Schwab,Wilhelm K <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:bschwab@anest.ufl.edu">bschwab@anest.ufl.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

Hello all,<br>
<br>
Can anyone recommend a good reference on the amount of time one should expect to spend writing tests?  I will have to be the messenger (will be wearing running shoes just in case...), but I want the message to come from a solid source.<br>

</blockquote><div><br></div><div>If you develop the TDD way (which I always do at work) then I would say this question is not valid. Your production code will be there because of tests. In legacy system, new and refactored code will be there because of tests.</div>

<div><br></div><div>IMHO the questions &quot;how much time should I spend writing tests?&quot; or &quot;how many tests should I write ?&quot; are raised when tests are written after. And sadly tests often become a burden in this case and doesn&#39;t support the pressure of releases / last minute changes / ...  (I&#39;ve done it this way almost 10 years ago, not good :)</div>

<div><br></div><div>In TDD the question is &quot;which stories / scenarios do we have to implement ?&quot;. It&#39;s more a Product owner / customer point of view. </div><div><br></div><div>The best book on TDD I&#39;ve read is Dave Astels TDD: a practical guide (Indeed, this one has really changed my mind on how testing should be done, and other books I&#39;ve read since don&#39;t).</div>

<div><br></div><div>Laurent </div><div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<br>
Bill<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
</blockquote></div><br>